10 Keys to Growing a Multicultural Church

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The real-life story of one church's multicultural journey.

Dan Willis, the pastor of Lighthouse Church of All Nations, shared his story today at the Society of Church Consulting.

He planted the church 35 years ago at the age of 17. It is now a multicultural church with 3,500 in attendance on the south side of Chicago. Dan, born and raised in Chicago, is an Anglo leader, with a church that is 70 percent African-American. The congregation represents more than 60 nationalities.

Dan unpacked a top 10 list of how to grow a multicultural church in a city that is number-one in racial homicide.

He stated again and again that his primary contribution as a pastor is his simple focus on unconditional love.

His most passionate statement was: “We wanted to make what was abnormal in our city normal in our congregation—LOVE!”

1. Make prayer the common denominator.

“Prayer is the heating pad for a congregation of love.”

2. Create an atmosphere of hospitality.

“We shower them with warmth; hugs, smiles and pats on the back. We give gifts and food as they leave.”

3. Study the culture of the community and the cultural nuances within the community.

Dan did 28 weddings in the last few months and had to learn completely different ceremonial nuances.

4. Respect and celebrate the differences of the cultures.

“We create unity by how we see the diversity.”

5. Serve outside the walls of the church.

They canceled their Wednesday services to serve the community instead, wearing yellow shirts labeled, “Soul Patrol.”

6. Engage the arts.

They regularly practice the “art of worship” in programs of their church, with creative segments and expressions.  Teens and kids are able to “act out” of the creative impulse in ways that are not typical.

7. Rally people toward participation.

“Get in where you fit in and fit in where you get in.”

8. Be OK when people don’t get it [the vision].

“Not everyone gets it. We can’t please everyone. We are all about bridging the gap and bringing together the races in Chicago. Each church has their assignment. This is ours, and some people don’t like it. That’s OK.”

9. Don’t give up.

A multicultural vision takes time.

10. Focus on love as the guiding motivation.

Always. 

Will Mancini Will Mancini emerged from the trenches of local church leadership to found Auxano, a first-of-kind consulting ministry that focuses on vision clarity. As a “clarity evangelist,” Will has served as vision architect for hundreds of churches across the country, including such notable pastors as Chuck Swindoll and Max Lucado. Will holds a Th.M. in Pastoral Leadership from Dallas Theological Seminary and has authored Church Unique: How Missional Leaders Cast Vision, Capture Culture and Create Movement; he also co-authored Building Leaders with Aubrey Malphurs.

More from Will Mancini or visit Will at http://www.willmancini.com/

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  • Duane

    Great article. The pastor really gets it. Many people are willing cross cultural barriers as long as Christ is the center, God’s Word is proclaimed, people authenticly pray and every person is respected (really respected) and loved. As long as we see people groups as people to love and serve and not markets to get and assimilate, I think we will see good things for the kingdom.

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