T.D. Jakes Addresses Zimmerman Case in Sunday Service

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Surprised by the "not guilty" verdict in the George Zimmerman case, Jakes hosted a panel to discuss it in their Sunday morning service.

Surprised by the “not guilty” verdict in the George Zimmerman case, Bishop T.D. Jakes and The Potter’s House of Dallas hosted a panel to discuss it in their Sunday morning service. According to The Christian Post, the panel included legal and psychological professionals, all members of Jakes’ church.

Zimmerman, half-Caucasian and half-Hispanic, was acquitted by a jury in Florida Saturday in the shooting death of black teen Trayvon Martin.

Jakes introduced the panel discussion saying that he “seldom speaks out about a case …” but that he “could not ignore his obligation.”

“I am generally silent because I have an obligation as a pastor to bring you the word of God regardless of what is going on in the times … (but) it would be disingenuous of me to not tell you quite honestly and quite succinctly that I was stunned, shocked, [and] speechless about the outcome of this trial,” Jakes told his congregation. “I think it is an oversimplification of the truth to say this is totally about racism,” he said. “I think that all people should be concerned. All people of all colors should be concerned.”

“Once you redefine something on the books (law), what happens when a woman is going through a parking garage and somebody follows her? And she’s taken some kind of defense training and she tries to defend herself and she gets shot to death,” Jakes insisted. “Now we have a case on the books that defends the one who shot them. … Now you have changed the standard and even if you think it was right in this case, what happens to the precedence that you set for the next case? For someone that has no weapon and tries to fight back, do you get to kill me because I can fight?”

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  • Michael Sims

    That’s an interesting perspective, one I hadn’t thought about, but the case was built around Zimmerman claiming he was attacked and hit first. I think if a woman attacks someone she thinks is following her without her first being touched, then yes, a similar ruling could occur. The law doesn’t allow room for us to ‘guess’ what the pursuer is going to do. We have to wait to be victimized before we can issue self defense.

    I am all for the church addressing cultural and community issues. My only hope is that they are open to respectfully hearing and considering both points of view, even if opposed it. I do not know if Jakes allowed those with other viewpoints of his own on his panel, but I would hope he did.

  • Roman

    Zimmerman’s nose wasn’t broken “after” Martin was shot. Jakes is obviously not familiar with eye witness testimony and the facts of the case.

  • Scott

    For Jakes to be “stunned, shocked, [and] speechless about the outcome of this trial” only reveals that he did not watch the trail or pay attention to the legal news analysts. Practically every pundit who was following the trial said the prosecution neither made it’s case nor disproved Zimmerman’s.
    That said, there was no “winner” here. The Martin family has lost a child at far too young an age. George Zimmerman’s “normal” life is over – I suspect that he will have to change his name and relocate. He will live the rest of his life knowing he took a boy’s life.

  • Thinking

    Rev. Jakes missed the boat on this one and has misinformed his congregation. … Or he doesn’t understand the case and is misinformed himself. The church should stay away from political issues. While racism is always wrong, but to suggest that Mr. Zimmerman was racially motivated based on the evidence presented in the trial would be unrealistic and misconceived. How could anyone with knowledge of the evidence presented in the trial be surprised by the verdict is a mystery to me. With that being said, Rev. Jakes cannot be familiar with the evidence presented if he was shocked or surprised about the verdict. Perhaps he should have waited to make comments until he was aware of the full scope of the trial evidence.

  • amos8

    “I think that all people should be concerned. All people of all colors should be concerned.”

    “Once you redefine something on the books (law), what happens when a
    woman is going through a parking garage and somebody follows her? And
    she’s taken some kind of defense training and she tries to defend
    herself and she gets shot to death,” Jakes insisted. “Now we have a case
    on the books that defends the one who shot them. … Now you have
    changed the standard and even if you think it was right in this case,
    what happens to the precedence that you set for the next case? For
    someone that has no weapon and tries to fight back, do you get to kill
    me because I can fight?”

    From what I can tell, I appreciate what he is attempting to do (although I have my concerns about what we don’t know), BUT if the concern is for justice, the law, the judicial system, etc, then how does this compare with the concern and outrage with the OJ trial outcome? Would TD Jakes have had the same meeting at his church? Would he/his church say “all people of all colors should be concerned”?

    Can anyone forget the exuberant celebrations when OJ was acquitted? Where was the concern and outrage then?

  • chris

    Jakes clearly doesn’t know what he is talking about and is causing more damage.

  • amos8

    Since the article goes out of the way to put race, ethnicity, or “color” into the mix (rather than a tragic event/death where one person shot and killed another person … was it justified or not?) at what point would Zimmerman have enough “color” (e.g. “half Hispanic”) in the eyes of those judging?

    These horrible things happen more than we realize, but is this one being discussed merely because of “color”? If they both were white, Latino, (or “white-Hispanic” as the MSM called Zimmerman) would it be any less tragic? If the “race” where reversed (shooter/victim) then should we not be equally concerned?? Why not care to the same degree just because a boy was shot and killed, or a 17 year old lost his life?

  • Living Word Church

    As TD Jakes is a Pastor that voted and supported our current president who supports gay marriage and abortion and other otrocities against the word of God. This is no new revelation that he would play the race card on this opportunity as well. If you are going to quote the word of God as your banner then let it be consistent.
    We need to stand for what is true, what is upright, what is good according to God’s standards not according to our race. Not surprised by this ministry making it about race

    • Elise

      Please advise on when and where Jakes has said that he is ok with gay marriage. To date, he has not performed one…ijs

      • Living Word Church

        I apologize if my post was unclear Elise, I said that our current President supports gay marriage and other situations that are against the word of God. For any Christian to support such a leader is wrong, unfortunately many leaders of the Christian world including TD Jakes voted and supported their culture or political party and NOT the Kingdom. Kingdom first is always the best choice. Blessings

        • Allen

          So should we have voted for Mitt Romney who practices a pagan religion………:)

          • Living Word Church

            lol yeah Allen it really was a lesser of two evils but thousands of innocent children’s deaths and same sex marriage in my book outweigh a pagan religion that does not support these otrocities. Would of been great for a man of God to be in a position for us to elect instead but we cannot have everything I guess lol. Blessings

        • Elise

          Your post suggests that TD Jakes was in agreement (supported) with a president who supports gay marriage and abortion.

          • Living Word Church

            Yes it does, whoever you vote for president represents what you support. Why else would we vote for someone? Blessings

  • waldix

    I must have missed something. Jakes never said that the outcome was about race. Many others have said so. Do not assume that Martin started the confrontation. There is no witness to that. Sometimes a person has no choice but to fight back. If Zimmerman had not had a weapon, he would not have followed Martin. Then what would have happened? Nothing!

  • Old G

    I would rather face a jury of my peers than a TD Jake’s legal panel.
    He builds a strawman with the “woman in a parking garage” – completely irrelevant to the facts of Zimmerman’s case.

    • Elise

      In all actuality, the jury was everything but Trayvon’s peers… There were no males, no African Americans, no Asians, No elderly individuals…must I go on here?

      • Mary’s1st

        It would help to get your facts straight. The peers of a jury trial reflect the accused and the prosecution helped to pick the jury.

        • Elise

          I still stand by what I said.

          • Mary’s1st

            As do I. Not sure why you would include the elderly or Asians as a peer group. I encourage you to read something beyond a newspaper to familiarize yourself with criminal trial procedures.

      • donfulano

        As stated, they are the “peers” of the accused. Trayvon wasn’t on trial. This is Civics 101. What in the world are our Public Schools teaching nowadays?

        Trayvon was from Miami, and only visiting Sanford because his family there couldn’t handle him. I have no doubt that if he would have gone to trial for possession of stolen merchandise and marijuana (the 2 things he was suspended from school for), he would have had a jury of his peers.

        • Elise

          Your ignorance shines BRIGHT! And I’m guessing because I’m black you assumed that I attended public school. You certainly do not know me. PEERS suggests that there will be a BROAD SPECTRUM of AMERICANS in the jury. PERIOD. I guess you think peers mean those of his own race(s) because that is the norm of JUSTICE received by Caucasian and Hisp-Cauc-Americans. Again PEERS never meant that members of the KKK should be the jury for the KKK. That would be just dumb. It definitely is NOT justice

          • donfulano

            With all respect Elise, I never assumed your skin color, and you shouldn’t assume mine. I did assume a public school education, because our public schools have morphed into antichristian reeducation centers. I wouldn’t blame you for being ignorant if that was the case. The State (as opposed to the Church) has an interest in turning out a people that are ignorant of both the Bible and the Constitution. I think the facts back that up.

            The peers in a jury are chosen from the population of the county where the crime was committed. I think Trayvon was sent to Sanford because his parents thought in part that the negative influences in Miami-Dade county were too much. What that says about crime statistics and the Black community in Miami compared to Seminole county, you’ll have to figure out for yourself. All I can say is that if you are black, you need to clean up your own house first and speak out against the “thug” culture that produces teenage gangsta wannabes like Trayvon Martin.

  • Ikwiata

    These comments from professing Christians are amazing. No wonder why God instructed Pastor Price to teach on “Race, Religion and Racism in the Church”. To all the prayer warriors, this racial hate and insensitivity towards blacks can only be addressed through intercessory prayer in the spirit. We are not wrestling against flesh and blood but a wicked demonic racist spirit that is using Whites and other races to perpetuate racism. To make the kinds of statements made on this post substantiates the fact that we as believers that are black must have a different strategy – and that is to tear down these strongholds in the spirit realm. We must tear them down and put the devil in his rightful place – under our feet!!

    • amos8

      How about … let’s be against racism … against ALL races FROM all races? And not just against racism toward one or two races/ethnicities? How about … let’s be against injustices … ALL injustices … no matter what the race?

      Routinely judging and labeling those who disagree with another person’s view/belief as “racist” is egregious, it is hyper-destructive. Of all the obstacles to overcome in race-relations this could be at the top of the list.

  • sentejr

    I am a pastor of a multi-ethnic congregation and it is my God-given duty to protect the integrity of the pulpit by not preaching or teaching anything that could stir up hatred and bigotry. The pulpit is not to be used to address racial issues but to preach Jesus who loves people of all races, tribes, and ethnicities. There are many places for Christians to discuss the issue of race but not in the pulpit. Just my conviction.

    • Elise

      Actually you have it wrong… You should be addressing issues that affect ANY population in your church. I think it is a coward who will not protect his sheep of ANY race.

      • Brian

        Define what you mean by “protect”. Jesus taught us to turn the other cheek, and he strngly rebuked Peter when he cut off the ear of one comnig to arrest Jesus, thinking he was “protecting” his rabbi…

  • Brian

    As mentioned in another article today, there were only two people on the face of the planet that know 100% what happened that night. One is Zimmerman, the other was Trayvon. So at best, there was only one eye witness to the incident…and everything else is hearsay and personal opinion.
    Really, the only possible verdict in this case was being not guilty, as there was no way to prove Zimmerman’s statements false, no matter what we believe about it. But…being found “not guilty” is a FAR CRY from beig found “innocent”….

    • donfulano

      So then, we can say with all confidence that the system worked.

      Why TD Jakes would side with the people that want to burn the system down is a mystery.

  • Courtney Richardson

    How is the example of the woman in the garage not relevant? same scenario. Why are everyday societal occurrences not relevant to speak of in the pulpit? Unfortunately I have been told by many I’ve encouraged to go to church, they want nothing to do with it because church is irrelevant to today’s living. So if the purpose is to bring souls to Christ and putting on the church blinders prevent us from addressing relevant issues, why should we not address these issues?

  • amos8

    “…it would be disingenuous of me to not tell you quite honestly and quite
    succinctly that I was stunned, shocked, [and] speechless about the
    outcome of this trial,” Jakes told his congregation.

    He was shocked? Consider …

    “The verdict that declared George Zimmerman not guilty of murdering Trayvon Martin
    was a traumatic event for America’s civil-rights establishment, and for
    many black elites across the media, government and academia. When you
    have grown used to American institutions being so intimidated by the
    prospect of black wrath that they invent mushy ideas like ‘diversity’
    and ‘inclusiveness’ simply to escape that wrath, then the crisp reading
    of the law that the Zimmerman jury displayed comes as a shock.”

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